Link to Living Tradition Homepage

REVIEW FROM www.livingtradition.co.uk

 


 

 

 
Sleeve not available
Kornog "Korong" GLCD 1209

Apart from Korong being an anagram of the group name it is a river which the album resembles because (it sez 'ere) it travels into the heart of a unique musical landscape.The group disbanded in 1987 after being formed by Jamie McEnemy six years before. In the intervening period they made four well received albums, then disbanded to pursue solo projects, some overlapping memberships with the mighty Orion included, most recently with Jamie joining that band for a time.

18 tracks then, from "Brittany's best-loved traditional ensemble" which in the main are a mix of material from that part of the world, with some Scottish songs which have somewhat unusual arrangements. "Child Noryce", for example swings to and fro between 7/8 and 6/8 time with words that very much take a back seat to the whole enterprise and are barely comprehensible, whilst "Killiecrankie" undergoes a similar fate - its 4/4 time turning into the exuberant swing of a Breton scottische, more than a little at odds with the reality of the subject matter. Whilst the tunes are well enough done I can't say that I'm fired up in any great way by them. From the pedigree of the bands' members, and past line-ups which have included the very tasty guitarist Soig Siberil, I don't doubt that they would live up to the various claims made for them here on the accompanying blurbs. I am saying, however that as far as this small silver disc goes (which is what the review is entirely about) that the groups' desire to make an "exciting new acoustic music" through "marrying Brittany's traditional tunes to the Scottish vocal tradition" to create "a revolutionary sound at once graceful and thrilling, ancient and contemporary" is unfulfilled on this outing.

Hector Christie

Secure On-line mailorder service Buy this CD online from The Listening Post
The Listening Post is the CD mailorder service of The Living Tradition magazine.
This album was reviewed in Issue 41 of The Living Tradition magazine.